Types of Wood, Background and Uses

Types of Wood, Background and Uses

A tree’s inner structure makes the wood. The wood is probably the most useful and versatile material in the world with thousands of different uses. It is environmentally friendly, relatively cheap and abundantly available. You can use wood in almost all the things around you. The important thing about wood is that it grows on trees in every corner of the earth. There are many types of wood and it is available in various colors and sizes. It is not surprising that all the wood comes from trees. As there are a lot of different species of trees, we have such a variety of different woods.

The many different types and uses of wood can be very helpful in selecting the best wood for the project. Regardless of whether you build something from wood or simply choose the wood for your home. The list of many wood types ensures you are happy with the wood you choose!

Types of Wood 

It is important to understand that there are three basic types of woods available. You can find here all the different wood varieties and their common uses. Each of these different types of wood can be used in various ways. As wood is divided into distinct types called hardwood and softwood, although its names do not always indicate its true hardness or softness. These three types are: Softwoods, Hardwoods, and Manufactured Wood.

Softwood

Softwoods typically come from evergreen (coniferous-like) trees (have needles and cones, and which retain them all year round, also known as gymnosperms. The wood and lumber that are milled out of coniferous trees are the softwoods. Unlike popular beliefs, softwoods are not referred to as softwoods because they are “soft.” Although it is true that some varieties of hardwood are very hard and thus harder to use, the distinction between hardwood and softwood is not very much related to the actual softness or whether a wood is harder to work with. Many hardwoods are softer than softwoods.

The popular softwood trees used for construction, woodworking, and furniture. Most softwoods are strong and used in many different construction applications, generally sold in house improvement centers. Often these woods are used to frame new constructions and to build structures in a utility style.

Examples of Softwoods Trees

Bamboo Wood, Cedar Wood, Cypress Wood, Fir Wood, Hemlock Wood, Juniper Wood, Kauri Wood, Larch Wood, Pine Wood, Red Wood, Spruce Wood, Sugi Wood, Tamarack Wood, Thuya Wood, Yew Wood

Hardwood

Hardwood typically come from large leaves (deciduous) trees (those that drop their leaves every fall because their seeds are covered with fruit or goblets). Hardwoods are derived from any trees not producing needles or cones. These trees are commonly referred to as leafy trees more scientifically referred to as angiosperms. The hardwood species are not necessarily stronger than those of softwood, but many species are famous for their beautiful and distinctive patterns of the wood grain.

There are also some woods that are not considered to be hardwoods, such as bamboo and palm. These plants are known scientifically as monocotyledons, but their characteristics are many of the same as hardwoods, often being classified as such. Sometimes bamboo and palm can fall under the next grade of engineered wood.

Examples of Hardwoods Trees

Abura Wood, Afata Wood, Afrormosia Wood, Afzelia Wood, Ailanthus Wood, Ajo Wood, Albizia Wood, Alder Wood, Algarrobo Blanco Wood, Almendro Wood, Amboyna Wood, Amendoim Wood, Andiroba Wood, Angelim Vermelho Wood, Anigre Wood, Anjan Wood, Apple Wood, Apricot Wood, Araracanga Wood, Ash Wood, Aspen Wood, Avodire Wood, Balau Wood, Balsa Wood, Banksia Wood, Basswood, Batai Wood, Beech Wood, Beefwood, Beli Wood, Bendee Wood, Birch Wood, Blackwood, Bloodwood, Bocote Wood, Bois De Rose Wood, Bosse Wood, Box Elder Wood, Box Wood, Boxwood, Brazilwood, Briar Wood, Brigalow Wood, Brownheart Wood, Bubinga Wood, Buckeye Wood, Buckthorn Wood, Bulletwood, Buloke Wood, Butternut Wood, Camelthorn Wood, Camphor Wood, Canarywood, Catalpa Wood, Cedar Wood, Chakte Viga Wood, Chamsie Wood, Chechen Wood, Cherry Wood, Chestnut Wood, Chinaberry Wood, Chinkapin Wood, Cocobolo Wood, Cocuswood, Coffeetree Wood, Cooba Wood, Coolibah Wood, Cottonwood, Creekline Miniritchie Wood, Cucumbertree Wood, Cumaru Wood, Curracabah Wood, Curupay Wood, Dalmata Wood, Deglupta Wood, Dogwood, Ebiara Wood, Ebony Wood, Ekki Wood, Elm Wood, Endra Endra Wood, Etimoe Wood, Freijo Wood, Garapa Wood, Gidgee Wood, Goncalo Alves Wood, Greenheart Wood, Greywood, Guanacaste Wood, Gum Wood, Hackberry Wood, Hickory Wood, Holly Wood, Hophornbeam Wood, Hornbeam Wood, Hububalli Wood, Idigbo Wood, Imbuia Wood, Ipe Wood, Iroko Wood, Ironwood, Itin Wood, Jarrah Wood, Jatoba Wood, Jelutong Wood, Jicarillo Wood, Karri Wood, Katalox Wood, Kempas Wood, Keruing Wood, Kingwood, Koa Wood, Koai’a Wood, Kosso Wood, Koto Wood, Laburnum Wood, Lacewood, Lancewood, Lati Wood, Lauan Wood, Laurel Wood, Leadwood, Lebbeck Wood, Lemonwood, Leopardwood, Lightwood, Lignum Vitae Wood, Lilac Wood, Limba Wood, Lime Wood, Locust Wood, Louro Preto Wood, Lyptus Wood, Macacauba Wood, Macadamia Nut Wood, Machiche Wood, Madrone Wood, Magnolia Wood, Mahoe Wood, Mahogany Wood, Makore Wood, Mallee Wood, Mangium Wood, Mango Wood, Mansonia Wood, Manzanita Wood, Maple Wood, Marblewood, Meranti Wood, Merbau Wood, Mesquite Wood, Messmate Wood, Mimosa Wood, Moabi Wood, Monkeypod Wood, Monkeythorn Wood, Mopane Wood, Mora Wood, Movingui Wood, Mulberry Wood, Mulga Wood, Muninga Wood, Mutenye Wood, Myall Wood, Myrtle Wood, Nandubay Wood, Nargusta Wood,  Narra Wood, Nyatoh Wood, Oak Wood, Obeche Wood, Ohia Wood, Okoume Wood, Olive Wood, Opepe Wood, Osage Orange Wood, Ovangkol Wood, Padauk Wood, Paldao Wood, Pang Panga Wood, Patridgewood, Pau Ferro Wood, Pau Rosa Wood, Pau Santo Wood, Paulownia Wood, Pear Wood, Pecan Wood, Pericopsis Wood, Peroba Rosa Wood, Persimmon Wood, Pheasantwood, Pink Ivory Wood, Pistachio Wood, Plane Wood, Plum Wood, Poplar Wood, Primavera Wood, Prosopis Juliflora Wood,  Purpleheart Wood, Pyinma Wood, Quebracho Wood, Queenwood, Quina Wood, Ramin Wood, Rasberry Jam Wood,  Redheart Wood, Rengas Wood, Rosewood, Rowan Wood, Rubberwood, Salwood, Sapele Wood, Sapodilla Wood, Sassafras Wood, Satinwood, Sheoak Wood, Shittim Wood, Silky Oak Wood, Sissoo Wood, Snakewood, Sourwood, Stinkwood, Sumac Wood, Sweetbay Wood, Sweetgum Wood, Sycamore Wood, Tamarind Wood, Tambootie Wood, Tanoak Wood, Tatajuba Wood, Teak Wood, Tigre Caspi Wood, Timborana Wood, Tineo Wood, Tornillo Wood, Tulipwood, Tupelo Wood, Turpentine Wood, Tzalam Wood, Utile Wood, Verawood, Waddywood, Walnut Wood, Wamara Wood, Wattle Wood, Wenge Wood, Willow Wood, Yarran Wood, Yellowheart Wood, Zebrawood, Ziricote Wood, Zitan Wood

Manufactured Wood

The third type of wood that you can find is manufactured wood. In this environment, the manufactured wood does not produce naturally, but it is manufactured. These boards are usually made of wood that is manipulated to have certain qualities or characteristics. These products, also known as composite wood, are often made out of scraper waste wood.

Manufactured wood is often processed by chemical means or by heat to produce a wood product that can meet certain dimensions that would be difficult to achieve from nature. Wood veneers can also be classified as wood made, because they often need to be handled using special techniques of cutting or joining parts together in order to produce a specific size or grain design.

Examples of Manufactured Wood

Fiber Board, MDF, Oriented Standard Board (OSB), Particle Chipboard, Plywood, Veneer

Types of Wood for Woodworking, Furniture & Building

Although there are three main wood types, there are thousands of wood species and varieties. Here we discuss the most common woods that you encounter in construction and woodworking. We will give an overview of the common characteristics of each wood type, and for what each wood type is most suitable.

All woods are listed in alphabetical order so you can easily find the wood on this list if there is a certain type of wood that you want to learn about. Trees and wood have been part of our civilization’s development. From early Paleolithic times, different types of wood have been used in the construction and manufacturing of tools, weapons, and furniture. The use of wood from ancient times was dependent on cost, quality, and availability.

Wood is a hard fibrous material that forms a trunk and shrubs or trees ‘ branches. There are numerous structural and non-structural uses for building wood. Since wood is a general term, its use in construction must be understood. Wood is only second in its use in the building world in terms of stone. It is a favorite material in the construction of homes, cottages, and boats. The chemical properties of wood are complex, but we have successfully used its unique characteristics to construct a variety of composite structures despite this challenge. Let’s understand why wood is so popular in building, home design, and decors.

Benefits of Using Wood

  • Wood is an easy to work natural material.
  • Wood is strong and stiff physically.
  • Widely available in large numbers and has a variety of products.
  • Each type of wood can be used for specific purposes.
  • It is lightweight and flexible.
  • It is so durable that it last very long.
  • It is available in a variety of colors and patterns.
  • Since ancient times the material has been utilized. Thus, qualified workers with sufficient knowledge of the various types of wood are readily available worldwide.
  • Wood preserves its thermal characteristics. It is therefore highly resistant against high temperatures.
  • The heat conductivity of wood in relation to materials such as aluminum, marble, steel or glass is relatively low. This makes it a good heat insulator.
  • It can absorb sound and echo, making it the most favorite material for buildings, offices and residential houses.
  • Wood is a bad electric wave conductor. It is therefore perfect to provide a living or work area with isolation.
  • Wooden houses are cheap to build, extend the benefit from low operating and maintenance costs over a long period of time.
  • Wood paneling is popular especially for ceilings that cover irregularities, minimize maintenance and simplify lighting fitting and ventilation systems.

Water and Wood

Wood has some interesting characteristics. It absorbs water and swells in humid conditions just like a sponge, giving out water when the air dries and when the temperature rises again.

Seasoning of Wood

A newly cut tree is somewhat like a sponge that comes presoaked in water and must be fully dried out or seasoned before using. Dry wood is less likely to decay, is easier to treat with preservatives and paints, and transport is much lighter and easier. Dry wood also is much stronger and easier to construct with. Typically wood is dried either in the open air (which takes anything from a few months to a year)

Treatment of Wood

Wood could last forever if not attacked with bugs and bacteria, and conservators can extend their lives greatly by preventing redness. Various preservatives work in various ways. For example, paint works like an outer skin, which stops the insects and fungus from penetrating and eating the wood, but sunlight and rain cause the paint to crack and shrink away, leaving the wood open for attack.

List of Softwood

Bamboo Wood (Softwood)

Technically a grass, bamboo stems may be hollow but are very strong. Although Bamboo is technically a grass and not a wood, it can be used for building many things due to the hardness and density of the plant stems. Bamboo grows in abundance in tropical climates and there are a number of different species available, which vary greatly between regions.

Part of what makes Bamboo able to resist decay outdoors is its natural waxlike coating. If you wish to stain, paint, or glue bamboo, you will need to sand the wood first to ensure the paint or glue grips to the wood. Moisture can cause Bamboo to swell or shrink, so it is best to let it acclimate to the environment before cutting, especially if you are in a drier and colder climate than where the plant is natively grown..

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: Lightweight, soft, hardness, Strength, High Density

Grain: U

Common Use: Narrow strips to create a veneer, plywood, garden furniture, garden decorations, fences, and privacy screens, cabinets, fine furniture,

Finishing: Sand the wood before polishing, sealed and protected for longevity

Cedar Wood (Softwood)

Red cedar is a common name for various varieties of cedars growing in the eastern United States region. The red cedar wood (also known as aromatic red cedar) is remarkably resistant to both decay and insect attack. It is highly aromatic and planes and shapes easily. However, it only has moderate screw and nail holding properties.

Types of Cedar Wood: Cedar of Lebanon Wood, Alaskan Yellow Cedar Wood, Atlantic White Cedar Wood, Eastern Red Cedar Wood, Incense Cedar Wood, Northern White Cedar, Port Orford Cedar Wood, Southern Red Cedar Wood, Western Red Cedar Wood

Origin: Mediterranean region, Eastern United States, Eastern North America

Color: Heartwood tends to be red or violet-brown. Sapwood is pale yellow or whitish

Density: Hard texture and lightweight

Grain: Straight grain with many knots

Common Use: Fence posts, closet and chest linings, wood carvings, outdoor furniture, birdhouses, pencils, closet interiors, bows, and small wooden specialty items

Finishing: Finishes well, but oil finishes are recommended

Cypress Wood (Softwood)

Cypress wood is highly durable, stable, water-resistant and red, making it suitable for construction and heavy construction.

Types of Cypress Wood: Australian Cypress Wood, Bald Cypress Wood, Gowen Cypress Wood, Leyland Cypress Wood, Mediterranean Cypress Wood, Mexican Cypress Wood, Monterey Cypress Wood,

Origin: Australia, Southeastern United States, Worldwide

Color: Light tan to darker brown, yellowish-brown

Density: Hard

Grain: Straight

Common Use: Veneer, plywood, flooring, furniture, and other light construction purposes

Finishing: Finishes well, but oil finishes are recommended

Fir Wood (Softwood)

It comes with low shrinkage and reasonable stability. It is also strong and elastic. Fir is another great economical and strong softwood to consider working with for beginning woodworking projects. Fir is usually a good choice for projects you plan on painting, since it can be sometimes difficult to stain and really does not have much of a wood grain.

Most varieties of fir have a very tight wood grain, which gives it a bit more strength and stability compared to pine. Fir is commonly used for construction and utility projects where a natural wood grain finish isn’t especially important.

Types of Fir Wood: Balsam Fir Wood, Bristlecone Fir Wood, California Red Fir Wood, Douglas Fir Wood, European Silver Fir Wood, Fraser Fir Wood, Grand Fir Wood, Greek Fir Wood, Nikko Fir Wood, Noble Fir Wood, Normann Fir Wood, Pacific Silver Fir Wood, Sacred Fir Wood, Spanish Fir Wood, Subalpine Fir Wood, White Fir Wood

Origin: North and Central America, Europe, Asia, and North Africa

Color: Sapwood is yellowish to reddish-white. Fresh heartwood can be yellowish-brown to reddish-yellow in color. However, it darkens quickly to a brown-red to dark-red.

Density: Medium-weight and fairly hard

Grain: Straight and plain, sometimes wavy.

Common Use: Veneer, plywood, and construction lumber.

Finishing: Finishes nicely. However, you need to take into account the fairly high sap content, which may require a coat of paint.

Hemlock Wood (Softwood)

Western Hemlock species are native to the west coast of North America, growing in the coastal rainforests of Alaska and British Columbia. The wood has an excellent strength-to-weight ratio. It can turn, plane, and shape smoothly. It has a moderate nail and screw holding ability. It also has a reputation for termite resistance. However, outdoor uses require good finishing for avoiding quick decay.

Types of Hemlock Wood: Eastern Hemlock Wood, Mountain Hemlock Wood, Western Hemlock Wood

Origin: North America, growing in the coastal rainforests of Alaska and British Columbia

Color: Heartwood is light reddish-brown. Sapwood is slightly lighter in color.

Density: Soft and light

Grain: Straight, with a coarse and uneven texture.

Common Use: Boxes, pallets, crates, plywood, framing, cabinets, joinery, and millwork

Finishing: Responds best to clear finishes.

Juniper Wood (Softwood)

juniper heartwood is highly durable (similar to redwood and cedars) and has aromatic properties like its close relative eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana). Juniper wood is slightly more dense than ponderosa pine. The wood is also quite hard for a softwood.

Types of Juniper Wood: African Juniper Wood, Alligator Juniper Wood,

Origin: United States and northern Mexico, East Africa

Color: Varies from milky white to deep reddish-brown

Density: Dense

Grain: Swirling grain patterns

Common Use: Veneer, hardboard and particleboard have all been successfully manufactured from juniper

Finishing: Finishes

Kauri Wood (Softwood)

Kauri is the largest and most renowned of all the native timber trees. Kauri in its heyday was a very versatile timber, of which large planks could be obtained, in an unblemished state as the tree has no branches for much of its trunk height, and unlike totara, was solid throughout the trunk.

Origin: New Zealand, Australia, and Oceania

Color: Varies Pale yellowish-white to golden brown

Density: Dense

Grain: Straight

Common Use: Boatbuilding, furniture, cabinetry, veneer, musical instruments (guitars)

Finishing: Finishes

Larch Wood (Softwood)

Larch wood, also known as Tamarack wood, is of the tree species in the Larix family. Technically a softwood, the Larch trees are an unusual type of tree in the Cypress family. What makes this specific tree unusual as a softwood is that it meets both the criteria to be classified as both softwoods and hardwoods. It is undeniably a conifer tree that has needles and produces cones, but the tree species is also classified as being deciduous since it sheds its needles similar in the way most trees lose their leaves in the autumn.

Among softwoods, it is known to be one of the strongest and hardest. Since it is in the Cypress family of trees, it shares many common characteristics of its Redwood and Cedar cousins. Tamarack typically has a reddish brown tone and is resistant to rotting and pests, making it an ideal choice for outdoor projects. The straight grain and hardness of the wood can make it more prone to splintering and chipping when working with it.

As is common with trees in the Cypress family, it is important to note that this wood may cause irritation or allergic sensitivity. The resins and oils of the plants which make it desirable for its rot resistance can sometimes cause issues for certain people. For this reason, these woods should generally be limited for uses that will not come into prolonged contact with skin. If you are working with these woods, you will want to make sure you take precautions to limit any irritation from inhaling sawdust and wear gloves to limit your topical contact with the resins and oils of the wood.

Larch wood is moderate-to-poorly resistant to fungal attack. However, it is durable and very resistant to rot and pests due to the presence of natural resins. Although knots are common, they are usually small.

Types of Larch Wood: European Larch Wood, Japanese Larch Wood, Western Larch Wood,

Origin: Northern Hemisphere,

Color: Heartwood is yellow to medium reddish-brown. Sapwood is almost white

Density: Very good strength and medium weight

Grain: Straight or spiraled with an oily texture

Common Use: Veneer, utility poles, fence posts, flooring, boatbuilding, exterior and interior joinery, and construction lumber

Finishing: Should be sealed before finishing to prevent bleed-through

Pine Wood (Softwood)

Pine is a very common and versatile softwood that has many practical applications. Pine typically is considered to be economical, sustainable and durable, which makes it a popular choice for a number of different projects. There are several species of pine, all of which have various different characteristics. Southern Yellow pine, as the name implies, may have a more yellow hue to it than the white or sugar pine varieties. White Pine and Sugar pine are sometimes also referred to as clear pine.

Pine behaves very well for staining a wide variety of colors and tones as long as you properly prepare the wood beforehand. Most pine is best suited for indoor use only, unless it has been specifically treated to be used in outdoor applications, as in the case of pressure-treated lumber, which is also covered in this list of types of wood.

Commercial pines are grown in plantations for timber that is denser, more resinous, and therefore more durable than spruce. Pine is very easy to work with and, because most varieties are relatively soft, it lends itself to wood carving. Pine is commonly used in furniture because it’s easy to shape and stain. Pine generally takes stain very well (as long as you seal the wood first). The resin of some species is an important source of turpentine.

Types of Pine Wood: Austrian Pine Wood, Caribbean Pine Wood, Eastern White Pine Wood, Hoop Pine Wood, Huon Pine Wood, Jack Pine Wood, Jeffery Pine Wood, Khasi Pine Wood, Limber Pine Wood, Loblloy Pine Wood, Longleaf Pine Wood, Maritime Pine Wood, Norfolk Island Pine Wood, Ocote Pine Wood, Parana Pine Wood, Patula Pine Wood, Pinyon Pine Wood, Pitch Pine Wood, Pond Pine Wood, Ponderosa Pine Wood, Radiata Pine Wood, Red Pine Wood, Sand Pine Wood, Scots Pine Wood, Shortleaf Pine Wood, Slash Pine Wood, Spruce Pine Wood, Sugar Pine Wood, Sumatran Pine Wood, Table Mountain Pine Wood, Virginia  Pine Wood, Western White Pine Wood, Podocarp Black Pine Wood, Chilean Pine Wood,

Origin: Northern Southern America, Brazil

Color: Heartwood is light reddish to yellowish-brown and sapwood is yellowish-white

Density: It is moderately strong and lightweight. But heavier than eastern white pine

Grain: Straight

Common Use: Ideal for construction lumber, plywood, and paneling. It is also used to make doors, windows and furniture, railway ties, mine props, and fence posts. Framing lumber, interior woodwork, sashes, and door stock, furniture case goods, and veneer

Finishing: Finishes well, but must be sealed with water-based or oil-based polyurethane

Redwood (Softwood)

The California redwood trees are a popular softwood for outdoor building projects. This California redwood trees are a softwood known best for their massive size and red color. It has a very interesting wood grain pattern, and much likes its Cedar cousins, Redwood is very suitable for outdoor applications due to its ability to be weather resistant.

Origin: Coastal northwestern United States,  Southwestern Oregon, Central California)

Color: Red color

Density: U

Grain: Straight

Common Use: Outdoor building projects, railroad ties and trestles, retaining walls, decks, and garden borders, tables, and large cabinetry

Finishing: U

Spruce Wood (Softwood)

Spruce is an evergreen softwood tree, and as mentioned previously is commonly found in lumber yards as “SPF lumber”. Spruce has a very light color, and therefore sometimes may also be sold under the generic umbrella of “White Wood”, especially in the cases of large home improvement retail chains. When spruce is permitted to grow to its peak maturity, it can have excellent acoustic properties that make it desirable for the construction of musical instruments such as pianos, guitars, and other string instruments.

Historically, spruce has been used to build aircraft and boats. Spruce is prone to swelling and not especially weather resistant so it is no longer typically used for these applications. White spruce wood turns, planes, and molds nicely. It has excellent nailing and screwing abilities. However, it is only slightly resistant to decay.

Types of Spruce Wood: Black Spruce Wood, Engelmann Spruce Wood, Norway Spruce Wood, Red Spruce Wood, Sitka Spruce Wood, White Spruce Wood,

Origin: Europe, Northern, Boreal (taiga) regions, Norway

Color: Heartwood is creamy white to light yellow or to red-brown. It is not distinct from sapwood

Density: Moderately hard

Grain: Fine and consistently straight

Common Use: Pulpwood, construction lumber, joinery, millwork, and crates

Finishing: Finishes nicely, but when using a sanding sealer, gel stain or toner is recommended

Sugi Wood (Softwood)

Yew.

Origin:

Color: He

Density: S

Grain: St

Common Use: Bos.

Finishing: Finishes well

Tamarack Wood (Softwood)

Yew.

Origin:

Color: He

Density: S

Grain: St

Common Use: Bos.

Finishing: Finishes well,

Thuya Wood (Softwood)

Yew.

Origin:

Color: He

Density: S

Grain: St

Common Use: Bos.

Finishing: Finishes well,

Yew Wood (Softwood)

Yew is native to western, central, and southern Europe. The heartwood of the yew tree is very tough and durable. The best timber, however, comes from trees growing in mountainous areas. It is also highly elastic. Thus, it can readily bend, spring back, and remain durable. It is also resistant to most insect attacks.

Types of Yew Wood: English Yew Wood, Pacific Yew Wood

Origin:

Color: Heartwood is orangish brown to darker brown or purplish hue. Sapwood is usually a thin band of pale yellow or tan color

Density: Soft, flexible, and moderately heavy

Grain: Straight, with a fine uniform texture

Common Use: Bows (archery), veneer, cabinet making, furniture, wood carvings, and musical instruments.

Finishing: Finishes well, but must be sealed with water-based or oil-based polyurethane.

List of Hardwood

Abura Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Afata Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Afrormosia Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Afzelia Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Ailanthus Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Ajo Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Albizia Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Alder Wood (Hardwood)

Alder is a hardwood that is slowly gaining a rising popularity due to its natural beauty, workability, and versatility. It is in the same family as the birch tree, so it often shares similar applications. This wood usually is easy to use for carving, turning, and machining. Alder wood has a very smooth surface when sanded which can easily be stained or painted. The Alder tree does not grow to be very large in diameter or height, so this is something to consider if you need very large solid pieces as they may be more difficult and therefore more expensive to obtain.

Alder wood produces a very clean tone that is hard to replicate with other woods. Alder is often more desirable for its tone than even the exotic hardwoods such as mahogany.

Types of Alder Wood: European Alder Wood, Nepalese Alder Wood, Red Alder Wood,

Origin: Northwest regions of California and Southwestern parts of Canada

Color: Appear to be almost white when freshly cut, but quickly turns to warm honey brown once exposed to air and sunlight

Density: Medium density

Grain: Straight

Common Use: Furniture making and cabinetry, photo frames and other decorative objects, hard body of electric guitars

Finishing: Works well with a variety of different finishing treatments

Algarrobo Blanco Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Almendro Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Amboyna Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Amendoim Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Andiroba Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Angelim Vermelho Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Anigre Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Anjan Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Apple Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Apricot Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Araracanga Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Ash Wood (Hardwood)

Ash trees are medium to large trees that grow in most parts of the world. Ash wood feels smooth to the touch. It is durable, tough, and flexible. It has excellent nailing, screw holding, and gluing properties. The wood takes stain easily and can be used for many different types of projects. Hence, carpenters love to work with ash wood. However, it produces a distinct and moderately unpleasant smell while working on it.

Types of Ash Wood: Black Ash Wood, Blue Ash Wood, European Ash Wood, Green Ash Wood, Mountain Ash Wood, Olive Ash Wood, Oregon Ash Wood, Pumpkin Ash Wood, Swamp Ash Wood, Tamo Ash Wood, White Ash Wood,

Origin:

Color: Light, creamy-brown

Density: Tough, flexible

Grain: Open-grained with occasional brown streaks

Common Use: Flooring, millwork, boxes/crates, baseball bats, and other turned objects such as tool handles

Finishing: Takes all finishes

Aspen Wood (Hardwood)

Aspen trees are often used in the production of wood for saunas. Aspen is a wood which takes painting and stain well.  Due to its general limited availability, it is typically only used for very specific projects in which Aspen wood is ideal. The wood does not conduct heat and can tolerate the moisture well with limited swelling or movement. This wood is also odorless and taste-free.

Types of Aspen Wood: Bigtooth Aspen Wood, European Aspen Wood, Quaking Aspen Wood,

Origin: Northeast America

Color: Light-colored

Density: 

Grain: Fuzzy texture

Common Use: Building of saunas, sometimes used in the production of matchsticks, drawer slides in furniture, chopsticks and kitchen utensils.

Finishing: W

Avodire Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Balau Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Balsa Wood (Hardwood)

Many fine woodworkers tend to have a negative viewpoint of balsa wood since it is not very strong, but it often underappreciated and has many practical uses. Balsa wood may be considered a child’s play to most serious woodworkers, but it is also perhaps the very catalyst that introduces many people to woodworking and construction. Balsa wood grows very quickly but has a relatively short lifespan. The grain of the wood can easily be painted or stained to use as a veneer in order to achieve a number of looks on the cheap.

Origin: North America from South America and Central America

Color: Pale reddish-brown color

Density: Lightweight, low density

Grain: Straight grain with a medium to coarse texture

Common Use: Hobby craft-making projects, childhood building projects and model kits, building rafts, life preservers, Surfboards,

Finishing: U

Banksia Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Basswood (Hardwood)

The wood is not prone to warping or movement once properly acclimated and dried. The woodturners often enjoy working with basswood due to its ease of use and availability. The wood also has no odor, taste, or known allergens. Basswood is easy to find and typically budget-friendly.

Basswood can be challenging to stain evenly. In most cases, it is best to appreciate simply the natural finish with a protective clear coat of oil or to paint the wood. Many decorative painters enjoy working with basswood projects because once it is primed will allow for a very smooth finish.

Origin: North America

Color: Light cream-colored wood

Density: U

Grain: Straight and tight grain

Common Use: Miniature woodworking and building models, food storage crates, kitchen utensils

Finishing: Natural finish

Batai Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Beech Wood (Hardwood)

It is a sturdy wood best known for its ability to easily steam-bend. Beechwood is quite durable and resistant to abrasion and shock. Because beech steam-bends as readily as ash, carpenters love to work with this wood. Beechwood is in the more affordable range of hardwoods, and can be found in a wide range of sizes. It also provides an elegant and dated look to furniture. However, it is not dishwasher safe. . The wood is relatively easy to work with as long as your tools are sharp. It can be glued and stained without too much difficulty if desired.

Types of Beech Wood: American Beech Wood, European Beech Wood

Origin: Europe, Asia, and North America

Color: Pink to reddish-brown heartwood, sapwood is creamy to pink

Density: Very hard and heavy

Grain: Straight with a fine to medium uniform texture

Common Use: Chair legs and backs, crates/pallets, railroad ties, flooring, food containers, toys, musical instruments, and woodenware

Finishing: Takes all finishes

Beef Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Beli Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Bendee Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Birch Wood (Hardwood)

Birch is a hardwood that is easy to find and often one of the more affordable hardwood species at local lumberyards and home centers. Birch is very strong and can be used for almost everything and anything you can imagine. Many people use birch as a less expensive alternative to Oak.

One thing to know about birchwood however is it can be very difficult to stain. Staining can sometimes result in blotchy patches that look uneven. For this reason, birch is an ideal and economic hardwood to use if you plan to paint your project. Though it is closely related to Oakwood, it is much harder. Birch plywood is probably the most widely used as it is hard, stable, affordable, and readily available.

Types of Birch Wood: Alaska Paper Birch Wood, Alder-leaf Birch Wood, Baltic Birch Wood, Downy Birch Wood, Gray Birch Wood, Masur Birch Wood, Paper Birch Wood, River Birch Wood, Silver Birch Wood, Sweet Birch Wood, Yellow Birch Wood,

Origin: Northern Hemisphere

Color: Heartwood is light reddish-brown with nearly white sapwood

Density: Hard, medium weight

Grain: Usually straight or slightly wavy with small pores

Common Use: Plywood, boxes, crates, turned objects, cabinets, seating, millwork, furniture, interior doors

Finishing: Takes all finishes

Blackwood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Blackwood: African Blackwood, Australian Blackwood, Burmese Blackwood, Malaysian Blackwood,

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Bloodwood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Bloodwood: Red Australian Bloodwood

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Bocote Wood (Hardwood)

A.

 

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Bois De Rose Wood (Hardwood)

A.

 

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Bosse Wood (Hardwood)

A.

 

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Box Elder Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Box Wood: Elder Box Wood, Gray Box Wood, Yellow Box Wood,

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Boxwood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Boxwood: Castelo Boxwood

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Brazilwood (Hardwood)

A.

 

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Briar Wood (Hardwood)

A.

 

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Brigalow Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Brownheart Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Bubinga Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Buckeye Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Buckthorn Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Bulletwood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Buloke Australian Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Butternut Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Camelthorn Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Camphor Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Canarywood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Catalpa Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Cedar Wood (Hardwood)

Many people are familiar with cedar not just for its interesting wood grain and color, but also for its aromatic smell which is believed to repel pests and moths. The aromatic scent and bug repelling properties are why it is sometimes a popular choice to use in closets and storage chests. Cedar is also an ideal choice for outdoor building projects. This wood is often considered to be rot resistant and can withstand the rugged weather outdoors quite well. There are a number of different species of cedar wood, which are members of the Cypress family. Certain cedar species are better for specific applications than others.

While many people adore cedar for its aromatic properties, it is important to remember that some people may be sensitive to the naturally occurring oils. If you plan to work with cedar wood, it is important to wear gloves and wear a mask to reduce the inhalation of the sawdust. Due to the high likelihood of irritation, Cedar should not be used for kitchen utensils or any other projects that would be used with food or have prolonged contact with skin.

Types of Cedar Wood: Australian Red Cedar Wood, Spanish Cedar Wood

Origin: West

Color: Reddish color

Density: 

Grain: Straight

Common Use: Drawer and wardrobe nuggets and coat hangers, decks, patio furniture, fencing, and decorative siding

Finishing: U

Chakte Viga Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Chamise Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Chechen Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Cherry Wood (Hardwood)

Cherry is a beautiful wood that comes from the American Black Cherry fruit tree. Cherry wood has rich color, smooth grain, and flexibility, making it a popular choice for furniture manufacturers. It is sometimes called the fruitwood. It also steams easily, making it ideal for use in curved designs.

When selecting cherry wood, you may want to take some time to try and ensure the pieces you select all match. Cherry can be stained, but most people opt for its natural state and will give it a clear protectant finish to let the beauty of wood and natural patina process that occurs with aging stand out.

Type of Cherry Wood: Black Cherry Wood, Sweet Cherry Wood

Origin: USA

Color: The color is light pinkish brown when freshly cut. It darkens to a medium reddish-brown over time.

Density: Stiff, strong, medium weight, and moderately hard

Grain: Closed and straight

Common Use: Cabinetry, fine furniture, flooring, interior millwork, veneer, musical instruments, paneling, turned objects, and small specialty wood items.

Finishing: Light to natural finishes are recommended

Chestnut Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Chestnut Wood: American Chestnut Wood, Horse Chestnut Wood, Sweet Chestnut Wood, Wormy Chestnut Wood,

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Chinaberry Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Chinkapin Gian Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Cocobolo Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Cocuswood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Coffeetree Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Cooba Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Cooba Wood: River Cooba Wood

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Coolibah Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Cottonwood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Cottonwood: Black Cottonwood, Eastern Cottonwood,

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Creekline Miniritchie Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Cucumbertree Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Cumaru Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Curracabah Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Curupay Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Dalmata Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Deglupta Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Dogwood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: S

Ebiara Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

East Indian RoseWood (Hardwood)

The rosewood trees grow in tropical environments including countries such as Brazil, India, and Madagascar. Rosewood is durable when dried properly. It comes with white chalky deposits that may dull tools and present problems with finishing. However, it is one of the toughest woods.

Origin: Brazil, India, and Madagascar

Color: Heartwood can vary from golden brown to deep purplish brown, with darker brown streaks

Density: Hard, heavy and strong

Grain: Usually narrowly interlocked

Common Use: High-end furniture, musical instruments, veneer, and turned wood objects

Finishing: Finishes well, but requires initial seal coats

Ebony Wood (Hardwood)

Ebony wood is easy to identify, since this is one of the few woods that are truly black in color. It is important to note that ebony is a protected species and is often heavily regulated worldwide. Cameroon is the only country where the wood can be legally harvested, and the harvesting practices are not always ideal. For this reason, it can sometimes be very difficult to obtain ebony wood. The tree is very slow-growing, which contributes to its scarceness.

Antique pianos very likely may have true solid ebony keys, although oftentimes the black keys were made with other wood types. As a wood carving medium, ebony produces a beautiful finish and is able to hold detail. Most woodworkers suggest using only hand tools with ebony, as the denseness and hardness can be challenging to machine. You will definitely want to reach for the carbide tipped blades for any type of work you may do with ebony. One should avoid any type of sealer or varnishes with this wood.

Types of Ebony Wood: Black and White Ebony Wood, Brown Ebony Wood, Ceylon Ebony Wood, Gaboon Ebony Wood, Macassar Ebony Wood, Mun Ebony Wood, Texas Ebony Wood,

Origin: Cameroon, West Africa

Color: Black

Density: Dense, Hard

Grain: Straight

Common Use: Wood carving and specialized woodworking, musical instruments, black keys on pianos

Finishing: Should not be painted, finished with very fine sanding and buffing and then waxed

Ekki Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Elm Wood (Hardwood)

It is valued for its interlocking grain, and consequent resistance to splitting, with significant uses in w. Often long, straight, trunks were favored as a source of timber for keels in ship construction. Elm was also prized by bowyers in the Middle Ages. Elm was also used to make longbows if yew was unavailable..

Types of Elm Wood: American Elm Wood, Carpathian (Burl) Elm Wood, Cedar Elm Wood, Dutch Elm Wood, English Elm Wood, Red Elm Wood, Rock Elm Wood, Winged Elm Wood, Wych Elm Wood,

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: Vagon wheel hubs, chair seats and coffins

Finishing: U

Endra Endra Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Etimoe Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Freijo Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Garapa Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Gidgee Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Gidgee Wood: Pink Gidgee Wood,

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Goncalo Alves Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Greenheart Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Greywood Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Greywood: Indian Silver Greywood

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Guanacaste Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Gum Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Gum Wood: Blue Gum Wood, Lemon-scented Gum Wood, River Red Gum Wood, Rose Gum Wood, Spotted Gum Wood, Yellow Gum Wood,

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Hackberry Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Hickory Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Hickory Wood: Bitternut Hickory Wood, Mockernut Hickory Wood, Nutmeg Hickory Wood, Nutmeg Hickory Wood, Pignut Hickory Wood, Shagbark Hickory Wood, Shellbark Hickory Wood, Water Hickory Wood,

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Holly Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Holly Wood: American Holly Wood, Cape Holly Wood, English Holly Wood,

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Hophornbeam Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Hornbeam Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Hornbeam Wood: American Hornbeam Wood, Europen Hornbeam Wood,

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Hububalli Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Idigbo Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

 

Imbuia Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

 

Ipe Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Iroko Wood (Hardwood)

Iroko is very durable and resistant to rot. Easy to work with and finishes well. The wood is tough, dense, and very durable. It is often used in cabinetmaking and paneling as a substitute for teak, which it resembles both in color (light brown to deep golden-brown) and in grain.

Origin: Tropical Africa

Color: Yellow to golden or medium brown

Density: Tough, Dense

Grain: Medium to coarse texture, open pores and an interlocked grain

Common Use: Flooring, furniture, cabinetry, and boat building

Finishing: U

Ironwood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Ironwood: Black Ironwood, Desert Ironwood,

Origin: No

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Itin Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Jarrah Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Jatoba Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Jelutong Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Jicarillo Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Karri Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Katalox Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Kempas Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Keruing Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Kingwood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Koa Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Koa Wood: Formosam Koa Wood, Koai’a Wood

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Kosso Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Koto Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Laburnum Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Lacewood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Lancewood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Lancewood: Brown Lancewood, Shirley’s Lancewood

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Lati Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Lauan Wood (Luan) (Hardwood)

Luan (also spelled Lauan) is typically found as a plywood that is made from the wood of Shorea trees. The Lauan tree in the Shorea family is a flowering species. While technically a hardwood, it is most likely we will encounter the wood in manmade engineered forms such as plywood. This wood is very flexible and can bend easily. Being lightweight and relatively inexpensive with reliable availability also makes it popular to use in other craft and hobby projects.

Luan is sometimes used much in a way as hardboard is to add some stability or a false back to a piece of larger furniture pieces, though this is more often just for “looks” than for actual function. It’s important to note that since luan features a willingness to bend and comes in a very thin piece, it should not be used for applications where it would be under a lot of pressure or is necessary for structural strength.

Origin: Philippines and other Southeast Asian

Color: U

Density: Flexible, Lightweight

Grain: U

Common Use: Forming Plywood, building miniatures and models, craft and hobby projects

Finishing: U

Laurel Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Laurel: Indian Laurel Wood

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Leadwood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Lebbeck Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Lemonwood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Leopardwood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Lightwood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Lignum Vitae Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Lilac Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Limba Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Lime Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Type of Lime Wood: European Lime Wood

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Locust Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Types of Locust Wood: Black Locust Wood, Honey Locust Wood,

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Louro preto Wood (Hardwood)

A.

 

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Lyptus Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Type of Lime Wood: European Lime Wood

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Macacauba Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Type of Lime Wood: European Lime Wood

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Macadamia Nut Wood (Hardwood)

A.

 

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Machiche Wood (Hardwood)

A.

 

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Madrone Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Magnolia Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Type of Magnolia Wood: Southern Magnolia Wood

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Mahoe Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Type of Mahoe Wood: Blue Mahoe Wood

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Mahogany Wood (Hardwood)

Mahogany is one of the most popular hardwood tropical trees. Mahogany wood is prized for its beauty, durability, and color. It is relatively free of voids and pockets. The color darkens over time. As a result, it is a popular choice for furniture. Mahogany is a beautiful exotic hardwood and a premium wood for furniture making. The wood often starts with a pinkish tone that will deepen and darken over time.

It is easy to work with and takes stain beautifully – often times this wood only needs a simple coat of oil. Out of all of the hardwoods, mahogany is softer than many of them, which makes it easier on your tools. Many musical instrument manufacturers also use Mahogany in the construction of guitars and pianos because it produces a clean tone acoustically. Mahogany wood is typically imported from South and Central America, and for this reason, it can be quite costly to purchase and difficult to find. These varieties are known as Tropical Mahogany.

Types of Mahogany Wood: African Mahogany Wood, Cuban Mahogany Wood, Honduran Mahogany Wood, Mexican Mahogany Wood, Mountain Mahogany Wood, Philippine Mahogany Wood, Santos Mahogany Wood, Swamp Mahogany Wood,

Origin: Southern Florida, the Caribbean, Mexico and Central America south to Bolivia

Color: Reddish-brown to blood red

Density: Medium texture and moderately heavy

Grain: Straight

Common Use: High-end furniture, interior millwork, exterior doors, windows, and trim of guitars and pianos

Finishing: Sanding sealer

Makore Wood (Hardwood)

A.

 

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Mallee Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Type of Mallee Wood: Brown Mallee Wood, Red Mallee Wood,

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Mangium Wood (Hardwood)

A.

 

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Mango Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Mansonia Wood (Hardwood)

A.

 

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Manzanita Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Type of Mallee Wood: Brown Mallee Wood, Red Mallee Wood,

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Maple Wood (Hardwood)

There are 115 species of maple. The maple wood is sturdy, resistant to splitting, and durable. It can be wiped clean with a damp cloth, making it ideal for kitchen furniture. Maple is a beautiful hardwood that is often used in applications where the natural wood grain is visible. There are a number of different species of Maple trees, and so for this reason when shopping for Maple you may notice there are two basic varieties to choose from: soft or hard. Hard maple is from the Sugar Maple tree, where the soft maple typically is from Red Maple trees.

Red Maple, also called soft maple is usually the top choice for woodworking, since it is much easier on the tools. Sugar Maple, also called hard maple can be difficult to cut and work with. Due to its hardness, Sugar Maple makes for a very popular choice for hardwood flooring. This variety of maple can take the abuse of being walked on and holding furniture without any indentations or scuffs.

Types of Maple Wood: Ambrosia Male Wood, Bigleaf Male Wood, Birdseye Maple Wood, Black Maple Wood, Curly Maple Wood, Field Maple Wood, Florida Maple Wood, Hard Maple Wood, Mountain Maple Wood, Norway Maple Wood, Queensland Maple Wood, Quilted Maple Wood, Red Maple, Silver Maple, Soft Maple, Spalted Maple Wood, Striped Maple Wood, Sycamore Maple Wood,

Origin: Asia, USA, Europe, North Africa, and North America

Color: The heartwood is typically a darker shade of reddish-brown. Sapwood color ranges from nearly white to an off-white cream color. But it can be reddish or golden hue

Density: Moderately hard but strong

Grain: Closed and generally straight, but may be wavy

Common Use: Everything from furniture and woodenware to flooring and millwork, kitchen

Finishing: Takes all finishes

Marblewood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Meranti Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Type of Meranti Wood: Dark Red Meranti Wood, Light Red Meranti Wood, White Meranti Wood, Yellow Meranti Wood,

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Merbau Wood (Hardwood)

A.

Origin: No

Color: Ap

Density: M

Grain: SE

Mesquite Wood (Hardwood)

 

Types of Mesquite Wood: African Mesquite Wood, Black Mesquite Wood, Honey Mesquite Wood,

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Messmate Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Mimosa Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Monkeypod Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Monkeythorn Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Mopane Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Mora Wood (Hardwood)

Types of Mora Wood: Guatemalan Mora Wood,

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Movingui Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Mulberry Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Mulga Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Muninga Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Mutenye Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Myall Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Myrtle Wood (Hardwood)

Types of Myrtle Wood: Tasmanian Myrtle Wood

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Nandubay Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Nargusta Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Narra Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Nyatoh Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Oak Wood (Hardwood)

There are over 200 species of oak in commercial cultivation. English Oak is known to the best quality and has been used for 1000’s of years. Oak is strong (hardness of about 4 on a scale of 1 to 5) and easier to work with when green. It is also resistant to moisture and is very durable. The wood is very resistant to insect and fungal attack because of its high tannin content. Perhaps one of the most loved hardwoods, oak is a very popular choice for woodworkers, especially in building furniture and high-quality heirloom pieces that can last for generations.

The two main varieties of oak wood you will encounter are white oak and red oak. White oak is a very hard hardwood and is an excellent choice for hardwood flooring. Oak is also resistant to rot and decay, so with the proper treatment and sealing can be used in outdoor applications. One important thing to know about working with oak is that it absolutely must be acclimated to your shop before working with it. Oak is prone to swelling and shrinkage depending on the temperature and moisture conditions, so it is important to take this into consideration, especially when using for flooring or if making containers such as wooden buckets that would hold water.

Types of Oak Wood: Black Oak Wood, Bog Oak Wood, Brown Oak Wood, Bur Oak Wood, California Black Oak Wood, Cherrybark Oak Wood, Chestnut Oak Wood, English Oak Wood, Holm Oak Wood, Japanese Oak Wood, Laurel Oak Wood, Live Oak Wood, Oregon White Oak Wood, Overcup Oak Wood, Pin Oak Wood, Post Oak Wood, Red Oak Wood, Scarlet Oak Wood, Sessile Oak Wood, Shumard Oak Wood, Southern Red Oak Wood, Swamp Chestnut Oak Wood, Swamp White Oak Wood, Turkey Oak Wood, Water Oak Wood, White Oak Wood, Willow Oak Wood

Origin: USA, UK, Europe

Color: U

Density: Hard, Strong

Grain: Beautiful “ray flake” pattern

Common Use: Shipping especially naval vessels and dock, interior paneling of prestigious buildings, furniture making and flooring, timber frame buildings, and for veneer production.

Finishing: Easy to stain with of different stained finishes

Obeche Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Ohia Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Okoume Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Olive Wood (Hardwood)

Types of Olive Wood: Russian Olive Wood

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Opepe Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Osage Orange Wood (Hardwood)

Types of Osage Orange Wood: Argentine Osage Orange Wood

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Ovangkol Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Padauk Wood (Hardwood)

Types of Padauk Wood: African Padauk Wood, Andaman Padauk Wood, Burma Padauk Wood,

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Paldao Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Panga Panga Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Patridgewood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Pau Ferro Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Pau Rosa Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Pau Santo Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Paulownia Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Pear Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Pecan Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Pericopsis Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Peroba Rosa Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Persimmon Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Pheasantwood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Pink Ivory Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Pistachio Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Plane Wood (Hardwood)

Types of Plane Wood: London Plane Wood

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Plum Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Poplar Wood (Hardwood)

Poplar is a popular and economical hardwood to use for a number of different building projects and applications. It does not have a very distinguishable nor necessarily attractive wood grain, so poplar is often painted or used in places where it is not visible. Of all of the hardwoods, poplar is a very softwood, which makes it easy to work with, but it also means it can be very easy to indent or knick while working with it.

Poplar is less prone to warping or movement. Since it is not exactly the prettiest of woods, for this reason, it is often used in parts of furniture that are not visible. Poplar is also often used in model building, as well as for many wood crafts. It is readily available at most stores that sell lumber as well as available in smaller pieces at hobby and craft stores that sell wood for craft projects.

Types of Poplar Wood: Balsam Poplar Wood, Black Poplar Wood, Rainbow Poplar Wood, White Poplar Wood,

Origin: USA, UK

Color: Light in color, and may even appear as white

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: Drawer slides or the inside pieces of dresser frames.

Finishing: U

Primavera Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Prosopis Juliflora Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Purpleheart Wood (Hardwood)

Also known as Peltogyne or Amaranth an exotic wood. Freshly cut the heartwood is dull grayish/purplish brown. Upon exposure, it becomes a deeper eggplant color. Purple Heart is challenging to work with but is extremely durable. Purple Heartwood is very durable, and can resist both decay and most insect attacks.

Origin: Central America, Tropical South America, Mexico, Southern Brazil.

Color: Dull brown, changes to a bright, vibrant purple

Density: Hard

Grain: Straight, sometimes wavy or irregular

Common Use: Boatbuilding, decking, flooring and furniture

Finishing: U

Pyinma Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Quebracho Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Queenwood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Quina Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Ramin Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Raspberry Jam Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Redheart Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Rengas Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Red Oak Wood (Hardwood)

Oak trees are native to the northern hemisphere. There are around 600 species of oak, both deciduous and evergreen. Oakwood is remarkably strong, heavy, and durable. It is also resistant to fungal attacks. Red oak has a more reddish hint of a color to it, and is typically what is most readily available at the majority of lumber stores. Red oak is slightly softer than white oak, which makes it a little bit easier to work with when building.

Origin:

Color: Pinkish red to blonde

Density: Very hard and strong

Grain: Varied and openly porous grain patterns

Common Use: Furniture, cabinets, molding, trim, flooring, paneling, turning

Finishing: Natural finish or oil, but they may vary

Rosewood (Hardwood)

Rosewood is an exotic hardwood, which often contributes to the expensive price of popular musical instruments. Rosewood is also a known irritant for many people, especially with prolonged exposure to the saw dust that may happen when cutting the wood. If you are working with rosewood, it is very important to use the proper wood safety precautions.

Types of Rosewood: Amazon Rosewood, Brazilian Rosewood, Burmese Rosewood, East Indian Rosewood, Honduran Rosewood, Madagascar Rosewood, Siamese Rosewood, Tiete Rosewood, Yucatan Rosewood,

Origin: Brazil, Madagascar or Asia

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: Guitars, pianos, and other wood musical instruments

Finishing: U

Rowan Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Rubberwood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Salwood (Hardwood)

Types of Salwood: Brown Salwood

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Sapele Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Sapodilla Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Sassafras Wood (Hardwood)

Types of Sassafras Wood: Blackheart Sassafras Wood, East Indian Sassafras Wood, West Indian Sassafras Wood,

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Satinwood (Hardwood)

Types of Satnwood: East Indian Satinwood, West Indian Satinwood,

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Sheoak Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Shittim Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Silky Oak Wood (Hardwood)

Types of Silky Oak Wood: Northern Silky Oak Wood, Southern Silky Oak Wood,

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Sissoo Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Snakewood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Sourwood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Stinkwood (Hardwood)

Types of Stinkwood: Red Stinkwood

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Sumak Wood (Hardwood)

Types of Sumak Wood: Staghorn Sumak Wood

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Sweetbay Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Sweetbay Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Sweetgum Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Sycamore Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Tamarind Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Tanoak Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Tatajuba Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Teak Wood (Hardwood)

Teak is an exotic hardwood. This is one of the hardest and most durable of all-natural woods. It takes a very long growing cycle, with the average tree needing 60 years before it reaches maturity to be harvested. While there are more sustainable forestry practices in place today than there were decades ago, this long growing process means that teak will always be a difficult wood to find that comes with a very premium price.

Teak has a naturally oily finish, which can make it difficult to stain or glue in some instances. The wood is also quite hard, and so you may notice that you need to sharpen and replace blades more often when working with it. Teak has an aroma that a lot of people would describe as being very distinct and earthy. Many people can be extremely sensitive to the naturally occurring oils in the teak wood, so it is important to not use teak for any type of application that would have prolonged and direct contact with food or skin.

It is resistant to rotting, sunlight, rain, frost, and snow, making it suitable for outdoor construction and furniture. However, it is expensive and sometimes hard to find.

Types of Teak Wood: Rhodesian Teak Wood

Origin: India, Myanmar (Burma), and Thailand, Asian rainforests

Color: Heartwood is golden or medium brown and darkens with age

Density: It is heavy and strong.

Grain: Grain is straight. Occasionally, it can be wavy or interlocked.

Common Use: Boatbuilding, veneer, outdoor furniture, exterior construction, wood carving, and turnings.

Finishing: Finishes best with wood lacquer

Tigre Caspi Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Timborana Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Tineo Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Tornillo Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Tulipwood (Hardwood)

Types of Tulipwood: Brazilian Tulipwood

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Tupelo Wood (Hardwood)

Types of Tupelo Wood: Black Tupelo Wood, Water Tupelo Wood

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Turpentine Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Tzalam Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Utile Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Verawood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Waddywood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Walnut Wood (Hardwood)

Walnut wood (black walnut) is one of the most popular woods for furniture. The dimensional stability, shock resistance, strength properties, and the rich coloration are the reasons behind its popularity. The walnut wood is a hardwood that is best known for its rich brown and dark coloring. Walnut can be expensive and often is only available through specialty lumber stores, but it is a beautiful wood to consider for special projects.

Walnut is relatively easy to work with, but is also very strong. Walnut is a fine-grained wood which polishes up quite nicely and can easily be stained and protected. Many people enjoy using it for wood carving, routing, and as decorative accents for wood furniture. Walnut cabinets are very popular, though it is common for less expensive woods to be stained to match a walnut color. The fibers of the walnut tree are very dense, which makes it able to withstand the shock and force the wood might experience in these types of uses. While walnut is one of the more expensive hardwoods, it is still a much more economical choice over other exotic hardwoods.

Types of Walnut: Bastogne Walnut Wood, Black Walnut Wood, Claro Walnut Wood, English Walnut Wood, New Guinee Walnut Wood, Peruvian Walnut Wood, Queensland Walnut Wood,

Origin: USA

Color: Lighter pale brown to a dark chocolate brown with darker brown streaks. Sapwood is pale yellow-gray to nearly white

Density: Medium texture, fairly lightweight

Grain: Moderately open grain

Common Use: High-end furniture, carving, flooring accents, musical instruments, and gun stocks

Finishing: Should be finished with oil-based polyurethane

Wamara Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Wattle Wood (Hardwood)

Types of Wattle Wood: Black Wattle Wood, Cootamundra Wattle Wood, Earpod Wattle Wood, Golden Wattle Wood, Green Wattle Wood, Ironwood Wattle Wood, Silver Wattle Wood, Spear Wattle Wood,

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Wenge Wood (Hardwood)

 

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Willow Wood (Hardwood)

Types of Willow Wood: Black Willow Wood, Crack Willow Wood, Diamond Willow Wood, White Willow Wood,

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Yarran Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Yellowheart Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Zebra Wood (Hardwood)

The most exotic wood is known as Zebrawood. There are several varieties of Zebrawood. This wood is characterized by its prominent striping pattern in the wood grain. It is a very heavy, hardwood that can be sometimes difficult to work with.

Zebrawood historically was most commonly found in high-end luxury items. The density and hardness make it desirable for manufacturing in things such as cars, guns, and other items that would require it to withstand shock and vibration. Today it is most often seen as a wood veneer that is used to give decorative accents to different furniture pieces.

Origin: Central America and Central Africa

Color: U

Density: Hard, Heavy

Grain: Striping pattern

Common Use: Premium furniture

Finishing: U

Ziricote Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Zitan Wood (Hardwood)

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

List of Manufactured wood

Fiber Board (Manufactured Wood)

Fibre board is an inexpensive manufactured wood made from the breaking down of hard or soft woods into fibers which are then bonded together with wax, resin, and heat to create a dense piece of wood. One of the most popular fiber boards is MDF – constructed of medium density fibers that are known for their strength and durability and lend themselves ideally to furniture products.

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

 

MDF  (Manufactured Wood)

Medium density fiberboard, more commonly known as MDF is another engineered wood product that is similar to HDF, or high density fiberboard, but with a lesser overall density. The differences in fiber density make MDF more suitable for different uses than Hardboard. For example, MDF has greater acoustic and insulating properties, so it is sometimes used in applications where that is desired, such as the inside of a speaker.

In general, MDF is not a desirable product to use in woodworking. It can be difficult to work with, and many people are concerned about the chemicals the engineered wood product may leach into the environment, specifically Formaldehyde. MDF is very strong and is considerably more popular than people think. With its strong/dense structure, your furniture is likely to last a lot longer than you expect, however it’s no solid wood, but it’s a fraction of the price of solid wood. MDF is extremely popular with Ikea, another leading furniture retailer. In the majority of cases, furniture built with MDF will have a wooden veneer bonded to it to give it an expensive looking finishing touch.

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: Strong, Dense

Grain: U

Common Use: MDF Furniture, inside of a speaker

Finishing: U

 

Oriented Strand Board (OSB) (Manufactured Wood)

Oriented Strand Board, more commonly known as OSB is a type of engineered wood product that is often used as an alternative to plywood. The wood is made using strands of wood which are arranged in a cross-hatched pattern to combine with resin and go through a thermal heating process. The boards are generally uniform in size and thickness, but it has a very distinct texture to it. OSB can often be painted, but the texture of the wood strands will be hard to avoid.

You will often find that OSB is considerably less expensive than plywood. In most of these cases, the OSB is covered with a veneer. While these furniture pieces may be inexpensive, they are definitely a lesser quality than those built with natural woods. A simple tap of a hammer can cause poorly designed laminate furniture pieces made of OSB completely collapse.

For this reason, most woodworkers would never use it for building furniture, opting instead to work with real wood. While it is never a first choice for fine woodworking, OSB certainly can be useful and cost-effective for a number of utility purposes. OSB should not be intended for exterior use. These boards will often start to break down after prolonged exposure to the outdoor elements.

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: Construction of residential homes, sheathing for floors, walls, and roofs, cheap laminate furniture

Finishing: U

Particle Board (Chipboard) (Manufactured Wood)

Chipboard is a manufactured wood, made from wood chips and shavings that are bonded together with resin. Chipboard is extremely popular when making furniture, especially Ikea furniture. It is a dense wood and is commonly used with a veneered surface that is used for flat-packed furniture and work surfaces.

.

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

Plywood (Manufactured Wood)

Plywood is an engineered wood product, though it is made with real wood. Plywood is made by adhering multiple layers of veneer together and compressing them. Plywood can come in a variety of different wood finishes, and most plywood has a “good side” and a “rough side”. Plywood is available in a variety of different thicknesses, with quarter-inch, half-inch, and three-quarter inch sizes being the ones you will most likely encounter at home improvement stores. Most plywood used in construction is made of fir, pine, or spruce.

Plywood is a very strong manufactured wood as it is a build-up of layers of wood veneers that are bonded together to create a flat smooth sheet of wood. It is popular in the industries due to its inherent strength and resistance to warping due to the bonded cross-ply construction.

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: Furniture and flooring

Finishing: U

Veneer (Manufactured Wood)

A veneer refers to a thin layer of wood that is cut from the circumference of a tree. It is then bonded onto a dense piece of wood, which is typically MDF, chipboard or plywood. Veneers are available in many sizes, ranging from 3 to 6mm thick. Many people mistakenly assume that veneered furniture is cheaper than solid wood; however, veneers quite often are used in high-end furniture pieces and it can be more costly than solid wood. The way to find out if your piece of furniture is veneered is by looking at the edges, and checking if the grain lines run off the top and over the edges of the wood. As a veneer is real wood, it will accept stains and finishes much like solid wood.

Origin: USA, UK

Color: U

Density: U

Grain: U

Common Use: U

Finishing: U

 

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